Prot/Post and Garage Punk for the Kids

Talk about non grunge music and music in general in here. Don't be shy, we don't bite.

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j-bug
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Re: Prot/Post and Garage Punk for the Kids

Post by j-bug »



As i have mentioned Kraftwerk, I feel i should probably include Neu! and if you dont know them, why? Where have you been your whole life???



Formed by previous members of Kraftwerk, they where plagued by all sorts of issues to get into the studio after the debut album, but i feel it was all worth it.

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Re: Prot/Post and Garage Punk for the Kids

Post by j-bug »

After a few days absence due to life and shizzle let me restart this thread by touching in punk i suppose. I don't think punk is the most interesting thing that happened to punk. It was so short lived, and the anger just kind of burnt out, or became saccharine sweet. But in a thread about the music that happened around it, it would be a terrible place to ignore.I think i will cover the big names on the English side of the pond to start with.

So Never Mind the Post Punk, Here's the Sex Pistols.



I own a lot of Sex Pistols 7". I was 13, worked in a second hand record shop, and my mother HATED them. She actually threw me out for wearing black lipstick and ripping a turtle neck off a t-shirt before painting "London's burning-Dial 999" in red nail varnish on it. Fun times! I lost the top in a homeless shelter in Brighton after i ran away. I was a strange teenager who didn't really fit into 95/96 Weston-super-Mare. I am a secret rebel. ;)



As previously mentioned, The Sex Pistols played the Free Trade Centre in Manchester, influencing a swaith of that cities musicians. Its easy to look back and see the connections between what the Pistols where doing and make connections but we are now 40 years away, 1970's England was the second worse decade of the 20th Century. Sex Pistols came along and told everyone "Fuck you,and you,and you,and you."



My favourite Pistols related record.
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j-bug
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Re: Prot/Post and Garage Punk for the Kids

Post by j-bug »



So this one time in 2010 i was sat outside the Tate Modern in London after going to see a Marcel Duchamp exhabition. Sat there by the Thames eating a sandwich looking out at the water, and this older chap was taking photos. We got talking, i think he asked to sit next to me. I was at Uni doing ceramics and wanted to be an art therapist. Turns out after a little nattering, he was a ceramist who had been an art therapist. He also was Joe Strummer's flat mate. We ended up looking at the pop art gallery and having the best hot chocolate in the members lounge. Fun day.



I mean, not as angry as the Pistols, and the could actually play (Sid, I am looking at you buddy.)

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Re: Prot/Post and Garage Punk for the Kids

Post by j-bug »



The Damned, what an interesting bunch of chaps. The first British punk band to realise a single, an album and tour America. Your welcome Yankees. How they still think we live in castles and drink nothing but tea after meeting these guys is truly beyond me. I actually don't have a Damned story. Hope this has done in its place...



Dave Vanian is still doing the Damned thang. From last month, with a nod to a band i will get to in a few posts.



I think this covers the most influential punk bands, but there are a couple more i wanna post, so bare with me.
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Re: Prot/Post and Garage Punk for the Kids

Post by XsInMyEyes »

I have been really wanting to post this band on this site. They're called Them. Hailing from Ireland and featuring vocals from Van Morrison, they may have been the band that opened the doors for proto-punk; everyone who was in some way a predecessor to punk cited them as an influence - notably MC5, and Iggy Pop said they they were the band to give him an idea of what his own band the Stooges could sound like.
Here, the track "Gloria" from 1964, you are also hearing the foundations of proper quiet-loud dynamics in rock music, that change from verse to chorus is pretty harsh for the time.
Among competing hypotheses, the one with the fewest assumptions should be selected.
- William of Occam
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